The Spectator

Living for the world of tomorrow

By Aaron Christianson, Editor

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While it is fair to say that a fair number of college students use Netflix, most are unaware of arguably one of the best animated films of this decade.

Don Hertzfeldt’s “World of Tomorrow” is a bit of an underrated gem that came out in the past year and is available to watch on Netflix currently.

While the animation style is a bit odd, the story it tells is an incredibly interesting, albeit a tad somber, tale of science fiction and what it means to be human. There is a lot that one can take from Hertzfeldt’s most recent project, in a crowd of three different people, not one of them seemed to walk away feeling the same as the others.

Former student Morgan Lamar was willing to sit down and offer her opinion,

“The experience was really kind of cool, I like the concept of brain cloning. It kind of reminded me of ‘The Giver’ for some reason, how memories are saved and given to the next giver.” she said.

To help make sense of what Lamar is saying, Hehttps://wnccspectator.com/wp-admin/post-new.php?custom-write-panel-id=1rtzfeldt’s short film takes place in the future, where humanity has found out how to extend their lives by cloning their bodies and minds and transferring memories from their past to these new bodies. Although this process is not necessarily without flaws as the clones tend to suffer from slight degradation and the older they get the worse it gets.

Student Harlie Dreesen walked away with a different experience though,

“I thought it was odd and kind of sad, it kinda ended on a sad note too. I’m not sure what to think of it” she said

While the film does not shy away from its more melancholy tone, the film does a good job of balancing the two. In a way similar to life itself the 15 minute film showcases both the brighter and darker side of things.

The film focuses on the interactions of  Emily “Prime”, a child currently,  and adult her clone from the future. The cloned Emily drags Emily Prime into the future and shows her the memories that she will eventually obtain. She tells her stories of her emotional shortcomings and falling in “love” with rocks, gas pumps, monsters and eventually a clone related to a man put on display as an organic art exhibit, named David.

While humanity has prolonged life, death is still an inevitability in this film and when David ends up passing away without warning, Emily’s clone states that she does not have the emotional capacity to deal with his loss. She does still feel saddened by his loss, she is proud of this sadness though, “it means I am more alive” she says.

While the film does have a darker tone, there are still unique blends of humor mixed into it as well. Due to the cloned Emily’s emotional shortcomings, her lines are all said in a deadpan and monotonous type of manner, which provides quite a few instances of dry humor. Emily “Prime” is voiced by Don Hertzfeldt’s four year old niece, all of her lines are quite cute, her lack of understanding being met with her clone’s lack of emotion creates a truly unique type of comedy that is pulled off incredibly well throughout the entire short film.

Niobrara County High School teacher, Cara Bandalos had this to offer

“The film is incredibly unique, its actually a bit hard to describe. On one hand I feel a bit sad about what I just watched, but on the the other I couldn’t help but laugh at quite a few of the parts!” she said.

The final and most important thing that can be taken from this film is that the time we have and the memories we experience are truly valuable.

“Live well and live broadly. You are alive and living now. Now is the envy of all of the dead.” – World of Tomorrow

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Living for the world of tomorrow